Posts Tagged ‘Ruthie Mae’

In Memory of the Sweetest Dog in the World

In Loving Memory of Ruthie Mae

I knew every day for almost ten years that I was lucky to have Ruthie Mae as my friend, and to be loved dearly and tenderly by the sweetest dog in the world.  We were the very best of friends.

Ruthie Mae passed on the first day of Spring 2015.

A Dog Smile

I’m Ruthie! A Beautiful Dog! I’m Nine Years Old!

Farewell my beautiful friend!  I shall forever be the incredibly lucky person who was loved by you!

Ruthie’s Human Mom,

Michelle.

 

Post Script:

Ruthie had a type of vascular cancer that commonly doesn’t present symptoms until the disease has progressed.  She became severely weak and shortly afterward, at the veterinary hospital, she passed peacefully.

Thank you for visiting this blog, dogkisses, named after Ms. Ruthie Mae.

 

She’s the Sweetest

RUTHIE

We walked down the corridor in the shelter for the second time. 

“Look at this one,” my friend curiously remarked.

She was the only dog not barking.  

We stopped to look, which is all I had planned on doing that day. 

“Oh,” my friend added.  “Her name is Ruthie.  How sweet.”

What an odd name for a dog, I thought to myself.

Ruthie.

Most dogs have exotic or quirky and whimsical names these days, it seems, but Ruthie is such a simple name, you know?

She put her paw up against the cage.  I touched it and so did my friend.

“She has puppy paws!” my friend exclaimed excitedly. 

My friend, Tiffany, was a dog whisperer in her own way.  Actually, she was more like a dog’s angel.  I was never sure whose side she was on when it came to her helping people and their beloved pets, a career which she had temporarily chosen.

“What do you mean puppy paws?” I asked.

“They’re soft!  Touch them,” Tiffany answered.

I’m pretty sure Ruthie became my dog the second I touched her paw and it was unusually soft!

“You should change her name,” the little boy who lived across the street from us told me the first day I took Ruthie out for a walk.

“Yeah!” agreed his young playmates.

“To what?” I asked, but none had an answer.

The children walked closer to us.  They tried petting Ruthie, but she became frightened by the youngest one.

She had been adopted for two weeks and returned to the shelter before I met her.  The shelter staff said the family had a toddler who was allergic to her.  That’s all they could tell me about her past.

Ruthie was indeed shedding a lot, but my gut told me it was from stress.  I was right too. 

After several days of living with me, she started to shine and I discovered, I had the softest dog in the world!  Everyone said so too.

I didn’t yet know she is also the sweetest, but I tell you, there isn’t one any sweeter than Ruthie is.

For the first few days of our lives together, her name came up for consideration.  Mostly because people remarked on how it wasn’t snazzy enough.

I forgot who it was, but somebody suggested that I read from the Book of Ruth in the Christian Bible. 

“In Ruth 1:16 and 17 Ruth tells Naomi, her Israelite mother in law, “Where you go I will go, and where you stay I will stay. Your people will be my people and your God my God. Where you die I will die, and there I will be buried.”  (SOURCE: Wikipedia).

I read the story and I knew my girl had the perfect name.

Ruth was loyal to Naomi, even after her husband, Naomi’s son, died.  Naomi had lost her husband and later lost her other son, leaving her widowed and without children. 

According to the law of the land, Ruth could have left for a better life, but instead she chose to stay with Naomi.  She married again and gave Naomi a grandson.

How could I think of changing little Ruthie’s name after reading that!  I had been given a gift, I believed. 

In the spirit of dogs and the love they give, my gift was a new dog.

I needed rescuing and I fully embraced the love from my new four-legged friend who had come to save my life.

After taking Ruthie to the dog store to show her off and buy a pretty new collar, we went home and I looked over her papers from the shelter.

I was surprised to see that Ruthie’s overall grade was an A-.

How could such a sweet loving dog not get an A, I wondered, so I read on.

“Ruthie pulls back when people lean in toward her,” the report read.

To get an A, a dog must also lean in when strange humans try to pet them, which I found curious.  I mean, if I had been abused, and I could tell that Ruthie had, then I wouldn’t lean in when strangers come toward me either.

I knew I had a smart dog!

Ruthie Mae is the sweetest dog in the world

Ruthie in her element hunting insects!

Without Ruthie Mae, I may not be alive today.

Ruthie didn’t save me from a burning building.  I’m not blind.  I have both legs, which I’m grateful for, and both arms too.  I am not in a wheelchair.

I am disabled by illnesses most people can’t see with their eyes. 

These illnesses have changed my life, and me.  I spend more time alone than I did before I got sick. 

I’ve also experienced significant loss of connection and sense of belonging, both in community and family, as a direct result of disability.  I lost my career and many people have judged me for what they can’t see or understand. 

Ruthie is my medical companion animal.  She’s officially an emotional support dog.   

Ruthie gets me outside.

She helps me want to keep going when chronic illness takes away my hope.

Ruthie is a teacher, like all dogs, I believe.  She shows me what love looks like. 

She teaches me compassion, tenderness and acceptance. 

It’s hard to put into words what all Ruthie means to me and how she helps me live.

Ruthie Mae’s love and companionship is always there for me.  No matter how sick I get, she loves me.  I don’t have to put on a well face for Ruthie.

Just yesterday, I was sad.  Ruthie jumped up on the bed and put her little paws across my ankles.  She gently laid her head on my leg.

“You really are the sweetest dog in the world,” I told her.  The tears stopped and I couldn’t help but take joy from the love I felt.

I thought about the kind of life she could have had if she had been adopted by a healthier person and one who has more money than I do.  I imagined her running in an open field of grass with her pack.  Then, I remembered the story of Ruth. 

Perhaps if Ruthie could choose, I imagined, she might choose me over anyone else, no matter what they had to offer her.

One thing I know.  I am loved. 

Ruthie Mae’s Human Mom,
Michelle.

Thanks for visiting my blog!

Note:

This post is a follow up from the most recent one, “Help the Sweetest Dog in the World.” 

Thanks for reading, and if your heart moves you, please visit my campaign page here.

 


A Campaign for the Sweetest Dog in the World

UPDATE:  5th June, 2014 

Thanks so much to the people who joined in to help me with my campaign!  I decided to cancel the campaign, mostly because my health worsened and I am no longer able to keep up with the necessary updates. 

I am truly grateful for the feedback and donations.  Ruthie is doing pretty well.  We haven’t figured out the best diet yet, but she’s hanging in there with my home cooked meals, mixed with the canned Hill’s ID. Continue reading

This Mourning Dove

Beautiful Backyard Bird is the Mourning Dove

This Mourning Dove is Smiling!

Mourning Dove in October One Mourning Dove stays when I approach with the camera.

I hope you enjoyed the photos of this beautiful backyard visitor.

 

The following is a link about this bird’s life history. (http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/mourning_dove/lifehistory).

Please see related links (at the bottom of this page) for interesting posts (and pretty photos) about the Mourning Dove!

Thanks for visiting my blog, dogkisses!

A note to those of you who are aware that my sweet dog, Ruthie Mae, has been recovering from a severe GI upset that happened after our end of summer camping trip. 

I’m happy to report that Ruthie is doing well!

She is still on a prescription diet, Hill’s ID, which is expensive, but has helped tremendously in her recovery.  I’m working on transitioning her to a more normal diet by adding boiled chicken and rice, along with pumpkin, to the ID food.

I’ve been working on a post about HGE, which is a rare and mysterious condition in dogs and is the diagnosis Ruthie received in early September.  I’m not used to writing about such factual information and I’m tired these days, so it’s taking me a while to finish the post.  I wanted to at least offer an update. 

Thanks to all of you who have expressed your kindness and concern.  Ruthie and I are most grateful!

Related articles

My Best Friend Walks on Four Legs

The original Miss ‘dogkisses’ is Ruthie Mae.  She’s from a royal bloodline!  I don’t know how such a grand dog ended up at the shelter, but she did, and I am one lucky woman to have met and adopted her!

Ruthie is home

Ruthie has been declared an Egyptian Beetle Hound Insect Hunter!  This makes her a very special dog.

I love her like I have all the dogs I’ve loved… Times ten!  Dog lovin’ is like that, I guess.  They are each special and unique.

Our Family Dog, a wonderful being!

I told you in a recent blog post about a camping trip with my family, and shared photos of the beautiful Blueridge mountains in North Carolina.

Ruthie is part of my small family, so of course, she went with us on our end of Summer, rather spontaneous outdoor adventure.

Alas.

I forgot Ruthie’s regular dog food.

It was several days after we returned home that Ruthie got an upset tummy.  Within 24 hours, her condition had become a veterinary emergency.  She had bloody diarrhea and was vomiting. 

We drove her to a nearby animal emergency clinic, which is also a teaching hospital, where I trust the doctors and staff.  I believed Ruthie was in the best hands around.  This gave me much comfort, but I was still afraid for my best friend and companion.

Since adopting Ruthie Mae in 2006, when she was about seven months old, I’ve never boarded or left her behind.  Watching her walk into the cage at the hospital clinic reminded me of when we first met, but it was a nice big cage and there were interns and residents who stayed in the room around the clock.  They doted over Ruthie.

Fortunately, she only had to stay in the hospital one night.  They gave her much needed fluids, intravenous medicines and watched her closely. 

She was diagnosed with possible HGE, but for sure a serious gastroenteritis, due to a change of diet and dietary indiscretion while camping.  Abdominal x-rays showed also three small rocks in her stomach and small intestines.  The surgeon said she believes Ruthie will pass the rocks without a problem.

I am very grateful that Ruthie Mae was able to receive good health care.  She’s relatively young, in otherwise good health, and has many years of loving left to offer!  

She has recovered very well, but she did have a setback when I tried to re-start her regular diet of salmon and sweet potato.  As a result, she’s back on a prescription food and two medications. 

Because of Ruthie’s sensitive digestive system, she may need more time to fully recover, but I think she will. 

I’m very happy to report that she is again recovering well! 

dogs are awesome

I am a dog, Mom. See my Nose?

Ruthie likes to put her nose to the ground when we walk.  It’s possible she got into something again (dietary indiscretion), when my son took her out for a short walk.  She’s fast and strong for a girl almost eight! 

I’m working on keeping her nose (and GI tract) clean, but I must admit, this takes constant attention.  We may have to get a special harness, but I’ll try training her first.  Walking without smelling stuff on the ground is against Ruthie’s nature, but that’s the way it has to be from now on.

As to what I’ll feed her in the future remains in question.

All you dogs out there, give a shout out to the sky or a great healing howl for Ruthie Mae!  She’s a beauty ain’t she!? 🙂

Thanks for visiting dogkisses, a blog, by a woman, who loves a dog!

UPDATE March 2014

Ruthie is now on a prescription diet.  It’s expensive, but so far, it is the only food that keeps her tender tummy at ease.   I’m hoping to meet with either the nutritionists at the school of veterinarian medicine, which is around $200.00, or meet with a holistic vet to discuss other options for Ruthie’s diet.

We have incurred a lot of medical expenses since Ruthie was hospitalized in September, but the tests helped us to rule out common diseases and also, x-rays and ultra sound did not show impressive findings.

Ruthie Mae may well have HGE, but she has also been diagnosed with Intestinal Bowel Disease and will most likely be on a special diet for the rest of her life, which I hope is a very long and healthy one!

You may give to my campaign at www.GoFundMe.ruthiemae (Link is also on my right sidebar in this blog).

My goal is to raise money to help me pay off the debts from the medical bills, so that I may better provide for Ruthie’s ongoing healthcare needs.

Thanks for reading about Ruthie Mae!